Manchester and Tatton

A nice day in Manchester, hard to believe, I know. Well they say the camera never lies, Photoshop often  blurs the lines, but even that would struggle to make it look like it was raining.  My wife was having some dental work so chauffeur turned photographer escaped in to the streets around Manchester.  The city of a Manchester has regenerated since the aftermath of an IRA planted bomb. It is now a mixture of modern, bright architecture and the old architecture showing the wealth generated from the textile industry and the entrepreneurial Victorian inhabitants. Their great legacy being the Manchester Ship canal which brought the  heavily laden ships in to my home town of Salford and firmly appointed Salford and Manchester as the Industrial centre of England.

My wife, with a jaw full of anaesthetic,  we have a (carefully) eaten pub lunch and afterwards arrive at Tatton park.  It has a history dating back to Bronze Age farming and has been home to herds of deer since the 13th century. In the late Tudor period Tatton was acquired by the Egerton family who owned the estate until the last Lord Egerton died without heirs in 1958. Maurice Egerton bequeathed the estate to the National Trust. It is now a major visitor attraction, a peaceful place with paths and open green spaces including Tatton Hall and its gardens.

The Egerton family are historically and fundamentally involved in the creation of the Manchester Ship canal and the earlier Bridgewater canal. The latter being said to be the first true canal. The two groups of  photographs connect the  industrial heart of Lancashire to the gentrified, lush green pastures of the Cheshire countryside.

 

 

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